12:19 pm, November 14, 2014 – Break from the cold this weekend, but more is coming in the longer term!

 

Current Conditions:
Sunny and chilly currently, with moderate winds from the N around 10-15 mph with gusts above 20 mph. Thankfully no rain or snow currently!

Short term forecast:
You will get a brief reprieve from the cold air tomorrow as the large high pressure center over the eastern US moves eastward and flow from the S bring warmer, gulf air into your region. Winds associated with this more mild weather will be relatively weak. The “nicer” weather will be short lived as this flow from the S brings moisture in the form of rain on Sunday afternoon and evening. The rain will be brief as flow from the N pushes the rain eastward. However, this flow from the N is associated with another strong polar front meaning the cold temperatures will be back. Can’t win ’em all we suppose…

Long term forecast:
Cold. Strong winds from the north. Cold. High pressure. Cold. Row fast to get to warmer weather. 🙂

Tonight
Low: Upper 20s
Winds: from the N at 5-10 mph til ~midnight, then from the E
Clear skies, cold. Bundle up!

Saturday November 15:
High: low 50s
Low: mid 40s
Winds: from the E at 5 mph
Clear, coldest temps early at night, warming by Sunday morning!

Sunday November 16:
High: depending on the front, anywhere between mid 50s and high 60s, get farther to enjoy warmer weather
Low: near 40
Winds: look fairly weak right now, from the E at 5 mph, but frontal location could change that…
Rains for most of the day, totals could reach an inch.

Monday November 17:
High: upper 40s
Low: upper 20s
Winds: strong, could reach 25 mph sustained winds, not accounting for gusts
Clear in the afternoon

Tuesday November 18:
High: low 40s
Low: low 30s, but warmer not too farther south!
Winds: from the N around 10 mph
Clear

Forecasters DeHart and Rux


Weather forecasts are provided twice daily by the American Meteorological Society Student Chapter at the University of Washington, a group of undergrad and graduate students interested in weather and climate. Learn more about them at http://www.atmos.washington.edu/uw_ams/.

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